Projects

Mobile Security

Mobile devices such as smart phones, laptops, and tablets provide computing, communication, and collaboration at any time or any place. These mobile devices store a significant amount of personal information including contacts and logs of who users call, text, and email. They have apps that provide access to social media sites like Facebook, which provides even more information about a user’s family, friends, and colleagues. Mobile computing is convenient and useful for society, both personally and professionally. As we move into the future, users will desire and demand more functionality such as the use of a smart phone to access their bank accounts and act like an electronic wallet to pay for items. Therefore, we need to design secure mobile systems that protect the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of the data that is stored on mobile devices.  The goal of this project is to provide mobile Internet security to mobile devices such as smart phones, laptops, and tablets.

RFID Fingerprinting

RFID Tag Fingerprint

Radio frequency identification (RFID) systems provide information to users about objects with RFID tags.  A threat to an RFID system is for an attacker to clone a tag such as those contained in identification documents like passports.  Drs. Dale R. Thompson and Jia Di at the University of Arkansas have developed methods to verify the identity of passive RFID tags to prevent cloning of tags.  They measure the wireless electronic features of an RFID tag to recognize the identity, or verify the claimed identity, of the tag.  They use the term RFID fingerprinting to describe this technique that has many different names in the literature including signal fingerprinting, radio frequency (RF) fingerprinting, RF identification, radiometric identification, and physical-layer identification.  This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. 1053286 and 0716578.  Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations’ expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation (NSF).

RFID Information Security (INFOSEC) Education

RFID systems require the application of information systems security (INFOSEC) to protect the information from tampering, unauthorized information disclosure, and denial of service to authorized users. Typically, students experience only narrowly focused layers of a RFID system such as the tag, air interface, reader, network, middleware, or applications in separate courses instead of a system-wide approach. The goal of this project was to improve the quality of education nation-wide in RFID INFOSEC by creating new learning materials and teaching strategies that address security at the tag, air interface, reader, network, middleware, and application layers. The developed educational materials are available at http://rfidsecurity.uark.edu. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0736741. Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations’ expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation (NSF).


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